Managing Your Attention. Part 6. Results.

Sticking to the Process as Results Occur

Sooner or later, what you want to happen will start to happen. What then?

There's one more piece I'd like to add, and then we'll sum up this part of our directing talk. If you engage in the process we've been talking about, at some point things will start to change.


You may find that you were holding in your inner thighs and are now able to let them go, or you may have been arching your back or holding your ribs and can now allow the back to widen and the ribs to let go.


When this happens, parts of the body will move, and when parts of the body move, this will draw your focus; you will feel the changes happening, and inevitably you will want to help. There is nothing bad about this -- in fact, it is to be expected.


But when it happens, you've got to see to it, first, that you don't become too distracted and instead continue to be aware of your surroundings. And you've also got to see to it that you leave things alone. In other words, the process of directing will tend to produce changes, which in turn will tempt you to "do" the directions; your job is to make sure you don't do them and get out of the way by continuing to notice your surroundings, to wish the directions, and to leave yourself alone.

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