Managing Your Attention. Part 3

Expanded Field of Awareness:

Being Aware of Yourself and What is Around You

In the previous post, we emphasized the importance of attentiveness to one's surroundings. In this post, we include a new dimension: attentiveness to the self without disruption of attentiveness to surroundings.

When you have given yourself some time to explore this, see if you can add kinesthetic awareness to the equation, without losing awareness of your surroundings. While looking at the ceiling, for instance, can you be aware of the contact of your back on the floor?

Being kinesthetically aware in this way does not require that you stop being aware of your surroundings. If being aware of your back takes you away from seeing the ceiling, then stop for a moment and go back to just looking at the ceiling, and then, without becoming too worried or concerned about it, simply add your awareness of your back to the mix.

Being aware of yourself and what is around you at the same time is sometimes referred to as an "expanded field of awareness," and it is the kind of awareness that this process demands.

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